13 Seconds Around The World

May 14, 2016 -- by Kareem Khalil

Kareem Khalil

One of the most things that pushes people on travelling abroad is getting deeply immersed in other cultures.

Culture exchange in general is attractive and stuff but going abroad without having such a general idea about other countries and their habits and traditions gets you in the spot of getting a cultural shock.

Of course these things are probably infinite and every country is one of its own.

Here are 15 of the most important things you shouldn’t do while travelling abroad:


1- In Ukraine: Don’t ever think about giving someone an even number of flowers for someone as a gift ”Ew3a!!”.

It is supposed in ukraine that giving even numbers of flowers are only for funerals, so take care while giving someone flowers as a gift as it might be creepy to give them even number of flowers.


2- Russia: Always remove your outdoor shoes when entering someone else’s home.

Before entering any house in Russia make sure of removing your outdoor shoes when entering someone’s home, even some people can give you slippers to wear specially for the house.

 


3-Thailand: Don’t touch someone’s head

As it is considered the most holy part of the body, It is disrespectful to touch someone’s head in Thailand so you must avoid touching someone’s head.

 


4-Japan: Don’t leave tips.

There is no tipping in any situation in Japan- cabs, restaurants, personal care. To tip someone is actually a little insulting; the services you’ve asked for are covered by the price given, so why pay more?

 


5-Mexico: take care while saying to some ¡salud!’.

It is considered rude if you fail to say ¡salud!’ (‘your health’) after a stranger sneezes.

So take care while saying to someone these words.

 

 


6-Malaysia: If you have to point, use your thumbs.

Do not point your forefinger at things. Instead point a thumb. Pointing a forefinger at anything is considered rude.


7-Brazil: Get the language right.

DO NOT ASSUME WE SPEAK SPANISH. We speak Portuguese - we were colonized by Portugal, though our languages are completely different nowadays. Actually, we have very few similarities with our fellow South American countries.

8-India: Don’t touch anything with your feet.

If you stomp over a book, national flag, image of a deity etc, you can get into trouble. While stomping a book is frowned upon (people will think you are an idiot), deliberately stomping an image of a god of any religion or India’s national symbols (such as the flag and the emblem) might get you arrested. 

9- Kenya: Remember, Hakuna Matata is not just a Disney song.

Everything runs late, don’t get pissed off or impatient, learn to go with the flow, things will happen, just not on time. Hakuna Matata. It’s the phrase from Lion King and it applies in Kenya, it means there are no worries, we try not to worry about anything and take everything in stride.

10-Italy: Don’t turn down food.

When someone offers you food or drinks, especially if you’ve just eaten the dish being offered and that was cooked by the house lady, you’re supposed to accept or have a good/nice excuse for not doing so. Refusing is considered impolite or a sign you didn’t like it.


11-China: Don’t give clocks or umbrellas as gifts.

Chinese people really care about homophones. Some, like the number 8, are considered good luck. The word umbrella sounds a lot like “separation,” and “clock” sounds like “paying last respects,” so those are bad. 

12-Morocco: Don't use your left hand.

There are some countries, such as Morocco, where the left hand replaces toilet paper. Thus, you will be labeled a filthy creature if you use your left hand to greet people or consume food. Use the right hand for these public activities in Morocco. Sorry, left-handed people.


13-Tanzania: Do not really handshake.

If they make a handshake it is just very brief and light, far from a firm handshake. Some youngsters like to make a handshake, then twist their thumb up and hold the palm. Or commonly, people will offer their wrist to be touched as a sign of greeting instead of a handshake.





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